Category: (17)

The Brevard County School Board was the recipient of the Chairman's Award. Left to right is Rob Rains, president of United Way of Brevard, with Mark Mullins, Stephanie Archer,and Beth Thedy, of Brevard schools, and Jeff Kiel,president and publisher of FLORIDA TODAY, and past chair of United Way of Brevard. United Way of Brevard 60th Anniversary and Annual Awards Celebration was held at the Hilton Melbourne at Rialto Place Thursday evening, April 27.  TIM SHORTT/ FLORIDA TODAY

The Brevard County School Board was the recipient of the Chairman’s Award. Left to right is Rob Rains, president of United Way of Brevard, with Mark Mullins, Stephanie Archer,and Beth Thedy, of Brevard schools, and Jeff Kiel,president and publisher of FLORIDA TODAY, and past chair of United Way of Brevard. United Way of Brevard 60th Anniversary and Annual Awards Celebration was held at the Hilton Melbourne at Rialto Place Thursday evening, April 27. TIM SHORTT/ FLORIDA TODAY

United Way of Brevard celebrated its 60th anniversary in Brevard County on Thursday, as well as a successful fundraising campaign for 2016-17 that brought in almost $6.1 million.

More than 300 people gathered at a Thursday night banquet at Hilton Melbourne Rialto Place to remember the past and look to the future.

“The mission of the United Way is to create a caring and sharing community,” said Nick Heldreth, chairman of the 1996 United Way Board. He was one of nine past board chairs who talked about the agency’s impact on Brevard.

“There’s a lot of nostalgia,” said Rob Rains, president of United Way of Brevard, as a soundtrack of music from the 1940s and 1950s provided by Swingtime Lite played in the background.

Rains has led Brevard’s United Way for 23 years, he said, which means he’s celebrated the 40th and 50th anniversaries of the agencies, too.

“We’ve raised more than $165 million in our 60-year history,” he said.

The local United Way has 43 partner agencies, he said. Through the work those agencies do, “people that needed help are getting help,” Rains said.

Therrin Protze, CEO of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, served as the 2016 campaign chair.

“United Way is so dynamic and part of the community,” he said before the ceremony. “I wanted to be a part of it.”

Adrian LaLaffitte, Board chair in 2014, said he sees Brevard County as a family. United Way makes it possible for the community to come together to support one another, no matter how big or how small their contribution.

“Small donations add up to big donations,” he said, “whether you’re a high-level executive or a cashier at Publix.”

Several awards were handed out during the ceremony.

Harris Corp. and its employees were honored for being the largest contributors to the campaign for raising $1.38 million. This is the 10th year Harris has hit the $1 million mark.

Bill Potter, who has served as the agency’s pro bono attorney since 1976, was honored with a 2017 Bridge Builder award for his service to United Way.

FLORIDA TODAY president Jeff Kiel, a past Board chairman, gave the 2017 Chairman’s Award to the Brevard County Public School District. The district has raised $1.4 million for United Way in the past six years.

Businesses running first-time campaigns were UBS Financial Services, Millennium Engineering and Integration Co., Whittaker Cooper Financial Group and River Oak Dental.

“Sixty years ago, a small group of concerned business leaders came together to address the growing needs in our community and how best to meet them,” Rains said in a press release. “Since that time, more than $165 million has been raised, numerous community initiatives developed to address needs, and hundreds of thousands of lives have been changed.  While we’re proud of our accomplishments, we’re also acutely aware that none of this would have been possible without the generosity and support of this community.”

Article by Florida Today, Complete Article [ HERE ]

FLORIDA TECH EVENT IS FREE, OPEN TO PUBLIC   

MELBOURNE, FLA. — The ethics of persuasion, whether in fundraising, politics, the marketplace or the community, will be explored with discussions and panel presentations at Florida Institute of Technology’s 17th annual Business Ethics and Leadership Conference Thursday, April 27, in the Hartley Room at the Denius Student Center on the university’s Melbourne campus.

Sponsored by Harris Corp. and Community Credit Union and hosted by Florida Tech’s Nathan Bisk College of Business, the free, public event starts with registration and continental breakfast at 7:30 a.m. and concludes at 1 p.m., following the provided lunch.

After a welcome by Steve Rivet, director of Florida Tech’s Center for Ethics and Leadership, the conference’s first session will feature Michael Seeley, president of the Health First Foundation. His topic is, “Perspectives on the Ethics of Fundraising.”

Starting at 9:15 a.m., the day’s second speaker will be Kendall T. Moore, managing partner at Moore Eavenson Baughan PLC, Attorneys at Law. His 45-minute presentation is, “The Ethics of Persuasion in Politics.”

A panel presentation begins at 10:15 a.m. with five participants exploring “Ethics of Persuasion: Opinions and Solutions.” The panelists are Lori Booker, communications director at Orlando Melbourne International Airport; Tom Haynie, a business major at Florida Tech who will be graduating May 6; Cheryl Mall, public information officer for the City of Melbourne; Roy Milton, a longtime Harris Corporation employee where he specialized in program/financial management and ethics; and Matt Reed, assistant superintendent – government and community relations, Brevard Public Schools. Bisk College of Business graduate student Natalie Plaia, who will receive her MBA on May 6, will moderate.

After a 15-minute break, at 11:30 a.m., the winning team in Florida Tech’s recently concluded high school ethics competition, from Rockledge High School, will offer its case presentation, “Great Lakes Chemical Corporation: Lead Additive Production Distribution.”

Rivet will then offer concluding remarks, and lunch will be offered until 1 p.m.

Seating is limited and registration is required by emailing Dawn Thompson at dthompson@fit.edu.

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Article by Florida Tech blog, Complete Article [ HERE ]

MELBOURNE, Florida—Embraer plans to slowly increase final assembly of its Legacy 450 and Legacy 500 midsize business jets at its site in Melbourne, Florida, on the Space Coast.

Production and final assembly will continue at Embraer facilities in Brazil. The split of the work between Melbourne and Brazil will be determined as the market and demand evolves, the company said.

“It is something we are looking at very closely,” Michael Amalfitano, Embraer Executive Jet president and CEO, said in an April briefing in Melbourne. “We are very sensitive to our employment base, both in Brazil and the growth of our plants here in the Florida market.”

Embraer is committed to the expansion of work in Florida, Amalfitano said. The U.S. is the largest market for business jets, with nearly two-thirds of annual worldwide deliveries.

In Melbourne, Embraer has enough land to grow and to “be able to do more things,” he said. “What that is going to be, first off, is the transition to the 450/500. There are definitely plans to grow.”

The site, which employs about 600 people, delivered its first Legacy 450 at the end of 2016. It will deliver one Legacy 450 and two Legacy 500s from the facility in 2017, said Phil Krull, Embraer managing director of production in Melbourne.

“That’s it for the year,” Krull said during a tour of the facility. “We are slowly ramping up on the Legacys.”

The fuselage for the Legacy 450 and 500 is shipped from Brazil. The wings and empennage come from Embraer’s facility in Evora, Portugal.

Embraer delivered a total of 12 Legacy 450s and 21 Legacy 500s in 2016. So far, the Florida facility assembles one Legacy every quarter.

“It’s a learning thing,” Krull said. “As we’re hiring, we’re constantly training new people.”

To take on the Legacy work, Embraer expanded its 80,000 ft.2 plant, built in 2011 for the Phenom work. In May, it added 150,000 ft.2. The facility will be able to deliver up to 96 Phenom jets and 72 Legacy aircraft a year. The plant is paperless and wireless, Krull said.

Article by Aviation Week, Complete Article [ HERE ]

More than 50 high-level representatives from around the world are expected to visit Florida Institute of Technology and other Brevard County and Florida sites after a coalition of north-central Florida cities, counties and agencies won a national competition by the U.S. Economic Development Administration to host the 8th Americas Competitiveness Exchange on Innovation and Entrepreneurship. ( ACE image)

More than 50 high-level representatives from around the world are expected to visit Florida Institute of Technology and other Brevard County and Florida sites after a coalition of north-central Florida cities, counties and agencies won a national competition by the U.S. Economic Development Administration to host the 8th Americas Competitiveness Exchange on Innovation and Entrepreneurship. ( ACE image)

50 HIGH-LEVEL REPS FROM AROUND THE WORLD TO VISIT

BREVARD COUNTY • MELBOURNE, FLORIDA – More than 50 high-level representatives from around the world are expected to visit Florida Institute of Technology and other Brevard County and Florida sites after a coalition of north-central Florida cities, counties and agencies won a national competition by the U.S. Economic Development Administration to host the 8th Americas Competitiveness Exchange on Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

The international event, known as ACE Florida, will run Dec. 3-9.

Participants will visit Orlando and Brevard County, as well as Osceola County, the Greater Gainesville region, Tallahassee-Leon County and St. Augustine.

They will see advanced technology centers, innovation hubs, public-private partnerships and strategic investments.

The itinerary will include agricultural, advanced manufacturing, aerospace, tourism, and other clusters, as well as Florida State University and University of Florida in addition to Florida Tech.

ACE Florida brings together decision-makers from the Western Hemisphere and other nations to explore global and regional partnerships and economic development opportunities that will strengthen innovation and entrepreneurship.

The Florida Tech visit will include a campus tour, interactions with President Dwayne McCay and other senior leaders, and a visit to the university’s Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Innovative Design, which is funded in part by the Economic Development Administration.

In addition to the campus visit, the Brevard leg of the tour is scheduled to include a panel discussion with executives from Embraer, Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman, a visit to Port Canaveral and presentations at Kennedy Space Center.

In addition to the campus visit, the Brevard leg of the tour is scheduled to include a panel discussion with executives from Embraer, Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman, a visit to Port Canaveral and presentations at Kennedy Space Center. (ACE image)

In addition to the campus visit, the Brevard leg of the tour is scheduled to include a panel discussion with executives from Embraer, Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman, a visit to Port Canaveral and presentations at Kennedy Space Center. (ACE image)

“We are excited to facilitate deeper connections between ACE program participants and Florida’s tech-based industries and showcase why North-Central Florida is the ideal place to do business,” said Cissy Proctor, executive director of the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity.

During the past year, the Florida coalition worked with the U.S. State Department and the U.S. Commerce Department on its ACE proposal. The federal government then presented the application to a global committee of experts headed by the Organization of American States.

“We appreciate your leadership and commitment to welcome 50 high-level decision-makers from the Americas and around the world by opening the doors of your communities to share your experience and competitiveness strengths,” said U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce Dennis Alvord.

“We strongly believe that when the right partners come together and increase their level of interaction great things happen for job creation, increased investment, and improved prosperity.”

Since 2014, ACE has been held in the United States, Argentina, Mexico, and Canada, becoming a catalyst to strengthen hemispheric ties, building on ideas and models that work to promote economic and social development.

Article by Brevard Times – Complete Article [ HERE ]

EDO Corp.'s North Amityville unit has been awarded a $29.5 million contract for 300 bomb ejector racks, the Defense Department announced. The bomb ejector racks are for U.S. Navy's F/A-18 jets. Photo Credit: AP / Lee Jin-man

EDO Corp.’s North Amityville unit has been awarded a $29.5 million contract for 300 bomb ejector racks, the Defense Department announced. The bomb ejector racks are for U.S. Navy’s F/A-18 jets. Photo Credit: AP / Lee Jin-man

EDO Corp.’s North Amityville unit has been awarded a $29.5 million contract for 300 bomb ejector racks, the Defense Department announced.

Fifty-two percent of the work will be performed in North Amityville with the remainder going to EDO units in Johnstown and Franklin, Pennsylvania, and Newbury Park and Riverside, California.

Work on the BRU-55A/A bomb ejector racks for U.S. Navy’s F/A-18, a supersonic jet that can operate as a fighter or an attack jet based on land or an aircraft carrier, is expected to be completed in April 2020, the Defense Department said.

The Naval Air Systems Command in Patuxent River, Maryland, issued the noncompetitive contract.

EDO is a unit of Melbourne, Florida-based Harris Corp., a global defense contractor with about 21,000 employees as of July 1 and revenue of about $7.5 billion in fiscal year 2016.

Article by NewsDay, Complete article [ HERE ]

The Stingray, manufactured by Harris Corp. of Melbourne, Florida, is a cellular site simulator used for surveillance. (Associated Press/File) more >

The Stingray, manufactured by Harris Corp. of Melbourne, Florida, is a cellular site simulator used for surveillance. (Associated Press)

– The Washington Times – Monday, April 17, 2017

Civil liberties advocates and federal prosecutors will face off Tuesday in the D.C. Court of Appeals over the city police department’s warrantless use of secret cellphone tracking technology to locate a sexual assault suspect.

The case represents the first time the Metropolitan Police Department’s use of the technology, a cell site simulator known by the brand name Stingray, has been challenged at the appellate level. The case has attracted the attention of the American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation — groups waging legal battles nationwide to rein in law enforcement agencies’ use of such surveillance.

Defense attorneys have appealed the robbery and sexual assault convictions of Prince Jones, arguing that the police department violated his Fourth Amendment privacy rights by deploying a Stingray to track cell phones in his possession and ultimately to locate and arrest him.

Prosecutors from the U.S. attorney’s office for the District of Columbia say it was unclear whether the technology was used to track Jones’ cellphone or a cellphone was taken from one of the victims — in which case Jones’ claims to privacy violations would no longer be relevant.

But they argue in briefs filed in the case that even if police tracked Jones’ phone, they still could have located him by tracking the victims’ phone. They also note that when officers zeroed in on Jones, he was on a public street and not in a home, where privacy protections might have come into play.

Privacy advocates began unearthing use of the surveillance technology by local police departments over the past few years, but since then only a handful of appellate courts have had the chance to weigh in on Stingray use by law enforcement.

A D.C. Court of Appeals ruling on the case wouldn’t be binding outside of the nation’s capital, but it will carry influence when other courts consider similar issues, said ACLU attorney Nathan Wessler, who will present arguments Tuesday against warrantless use of cell-site simulators.

The devices work by mimicking cell towers to trick cellphones to connect to them, enabling investigators to obtain identifying information about the phones and their precise locations. Under non-disclosure agreements with federal law enforcement, local police departments in possession of such technology have fought to keep secret their use of the equipment — even going to the extreme of dropping charges to avoid disclosing their use.

The D.C. Public Defenders Service, which is representing Jones, notes in its brief that in the time since the appeal was filed, two other courts “have held that the Fourth Amendment requires the government to get a warrant before using a cell site simulator to track a person’s location.”

The Maryland Court of Special Appeals ruled last year that police must establish probable cause and get a warrant before using cell-site simulators. Meanwhile, a Manhattan-based federal judge ordered that evidence be barred from a case in which the Drug Enforcement Administration failed to get a warrant before using a Stingray to track a phone to the apartment of a suspected drug dealer.

Jones was sentenced to 66 years in prison in 2014 after he was convicted of sexually assaulting two women who were contacted for escort services through Backpage.com.

MPD first began tracking his whereabouts by retrieving the phone number used to call the women from the escort ads, who were forced at knifepoint to perform oral sex and then robbed of their belongings. Court records indicate that investigators used data supplied by telephone companies to ping the phone as well as one of the victim’s stolen phones, and discovered that they were in the same general area near the Minnesota Avenue Metro station in Northeast.

Police deployed a cell-site simulator to pinpoint the exact location of the phones, but officers said during Jones’ trial in a lower court that they could not recall which cellphone was tracked by the device. The simulator eventually zeroed in on Jones, whom officers found sitting in his car with his girlfriend outside the Metro station. After officers stopped Jones, they found in his possession the phone used to contact the women, their stolen cellphones, and a folding knife.

Prosecutors argue that rulings by the Maryland and New York courts are not relevant to the Jones case because they both involved tracking of cellphones inside defendants’ homes.

“The simulator revealed appellant’s location in plain view on a public street,” prosecutors wrote in their brief filed in the case. “Accordingly, the police did not obtain any information pertaining to the private contents of appellant’s home, or any other area as to which appellant had a reasonable expectation of privacy.”

The Public Defenders Service states that the issue came up in the Maryland case and that the court “concluded that because police cannot know in advance whether the target phone is in a public or private space, the only workable rule is a bright-line requirement that police must obtain a warrant every time a cell site simulator is used.”

Prosecutors pushed back against claims this type of surveillance is a violation of the Fourth Amendment, arguing that the police department’s use of a cell-site simulator does not amount to what the Supreme Court has defined as “trespassory search” of constitutionally protected areas including people, houses, papers and effects.

They argued that using the technology to find the phone “did not violate appellant’s reasonable expectation of privacy” in part because cell phone users have no expectation of privacy when their phones are on and are transmitting signals and location data to wireless companies and cell towers.

Mr. Wessler said the argument runs contrary to cellphone users’ assumption that they are not consenting to have their movements tracked by the government just because they carry cellphones.

Given the large number of bystanders, whose cellphone information is also swept up when law enforcement deploys Stingrays, Mr. Wessler said judicial oversight should be required.

Though some states have mandated that law enforcement obtains warrants before using the technology, and Justice Department guidance now indicates that federal law enforcement agencies obtain warrants in most cases, it is unclear what policies guide the vast majority of departments’ use of the technology, Mr. Wessler said.

“There has been some steady movement for greater protection but the kind of patchwork nature of the protections speaks to the need for Congress to step in and for courts to address the issue,” he said.

The three-judge panel hearing the case Tuesday is comprised of Judge Corinne Beckwith, an appointee of President Obama; Judge Phyllis D. Thompson, an appointee of President George W. Bush; and Judge Michael William Farrell, an appointee of President George H.W. Bush.

Article by Washington Times – Complete Article [ HERE ]

Longbow LLC's Hellfire Missile

Longbow LLC’s Hellfire Missile

A joint-venture between Lockheed Martin Corp. and Northrop Grumman Corp.won a $10.7 million contract on April 13, according to the U.S. Department of Defense.

Longbow LLC, the joint-venture defense company based in Orlando, will conduct Hellfire missile engineering services for the U.S. Army. The contract has an April 12, 2018, completion date with work being done in Orlando.

Bethesda, Md.-based Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) and Falls Church, Va.-based Northrop Grumman (NYSE: NOC) both have a major presence in Central Florida. Lockheed Martin, which has more than 7,000 Orlando workers, currently has nearly 600 jobs listed on its website. Northrop Grumman, which is building a 500,000-square-foot business complex in Melbourne, plans to hire nearly 2,000 in the area once that’s completed and currently has more than 250 jobs available on its website.

Military contracts contribute to the local economy in the form of jobs and subcontractor opportunities, and Central Florida is a major player when it comes to defense contracts.

The region snags about $4 billion in government contracts each year because the nation’s Army, Air Force, Navy and Marines simulation operations are based in Central Florida Research Park. That work helps make Orlando the modeling, simulation and training capital of the world, according to the Orlando Economic Development Commission.

Richardson covers technology and general assignments for online and print.

Article by Orldando Business Journal, Complete Article [ HERE ]

“Stellaris Glucose Monitor” won Northrop Grumman’s Best in Show for engineering.

“Stellaris Glucose Monitor” won Northrop Grumman’s Best in Show for engineering.

WINNING PROJECTS RECOGNIZE BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING AND ALZHEIMER’S RESEARCH 

MELBOURNE, FLA. — With more than 160 different posters and exhibits on display at the Northrop Grumman Engineering & Science Student Design Showcase at Florida Institute of Technology on April 7, judges surveyed a wide variety of outstanding science and engineering scholarship to settle on final winners.

Science and engineering judges from Northrop Grumman said they were impressed by the quality of the students’ work.

Bob Dietl, who oversaw the engineering judging for the first time this year said, “The creativity and innovation were nothing but first class.”

And Mark Nichols, who oversaw science judging (also for the first time this year) added, “We were blown away by the amount of effort students put into this.”

The four most prestigious awards handed out after the showcase were the President’s Cup awards and the Engineering Champion and Science Champion “best in show” awards from Northrop Grumman.

The winners in the 2017 showcase were:

From the College of Engineering:

  • President’s Cup award winner: “CARACAL 3D Biomedical Reconstruction,” Pamela Forero, Daniela Friere, Cameron Hume, Prabhuti Kharel and Rahmatul Mahmoud.
  • Northrop Grumman Best in Show winner: “Stellaris Glucose Monitor,” Trevor Schmitt, Kevin Aiosa, Fernanda Charbonneau and Brandon Boucher.

From the College of Science:

  • President’s Cup award winner: “Trimethyl Amine N-Oxide & Protein Aggregation,” Benjamin Orris.
  • Northrop Grumman Best in Show winner: Pattern Recognition Applied to a Cancer Database and COPASI Modeling for Melanoma Gene Analysis,” Nicardo Cameron and Alexia Pearah.

There were also awards given to each department and/or discipline within the two colleges.

For the College of Engineering, those recipients were:

Aerospace Engineering: “Project Cerberus Spacecraft Prototype” Evelyn Stein, Larissa Balestrero, Veronica Echazabal, Zackary Gurdon-Cobham, Justin, Moody, Zachary Paryzek, Max Skuhersky and Kineo Wallace.

Biomedical Engineering: “CROM: Continuous Resistance Orthotic for Microgravity,” Benjamin Cooley, Jake Sheroff, Amy Gutierrez, Matthew Kraska,

Charles Curt and Ikechukwu Asomugha.

Chemical Engineering: “Nanoparticle Production Plant,” James Barr, Victoria Cowdrick, Rossy Espinal and Patrick Mulcahy.

Civil Engineering: “XXX Manufacturing Facility/Fray Engineering Solutions,” Michael Cherry, Jonathan Grant, Dane Fray, Randall Waters and Marcus Mancini.

Computer Engineering: “myTFF: Parent-Approved Communication Device,” David Elliott and Emily Broom.

Computer Science: “Simple Segmentation of Small Networks (S3N),” Aaron Nies and Stephen L’Allier.

Construction Management: “Grey Shell Proposal for FIT Academic QAD Renovation,” Ryen Forry, Benjamin Abell, Jahad Al Araimi and Sami Altoiabi.

Electrical Engineering: “Duct Sterilization,” Spencer Tuttle and Doug Schoeller.

Marine & Environmental Systems: “Development of Expendable Low Cost Electric Field Meters,” Nicholas Burton and Mahra Al Ruwaishdi.

Mechanical Engineering: “Formula SAE,” Ashton Tassinari, Asher Patton, Diego D’Ignazi, Giovani Alfieri, Harry Brown, Isreal Rivera, Justin Butinsky, Matt Walsh, Mohamed Almarzooqi, Odrik Ferrer, Preston Seward, Roberto Martienz, Saeed Almansoori, Saeed BinThaleth, Yifan Qiuan, Abdul Rahman Al Hammadi, Abdulmajeed Alali and Alex Frosted.

Multidisciplinary: “CARACAL 3D Biomedical Reconstruction,” Pamela Forero, Daniela Friere, Cameron Hume, Prabhuti Kharel and Rahmatul Mahmoud.

Ocean Engineering: “S.A.T.I.R.E ROV,” Karen Diaz, Miguel Perilla, Suzanna Trujillo and Bruce Walker.

For College of Science, those recipients were:

Biology of a Changing Planet: “Factors Affecting Anuran Presence in Brevard County, Florida,” Sebastian Martinez and Palomera Baez.

Cellular & Molecular Biology: “Inorganic Pyrophosphatase (pyp-1) Modulates Paralysis in an Alzheimer’s Disease Model,” Jasmin Pimentel and Lindsey Barrett.

Marine Science & Aquaculture: “The Effect of Probiotics in Fishes,” Dave Schlarman and Samantha Paitsel.

Chemistry: “Development of a Synthesis for a Four-Carbon-Bridged Carbazolopyridinophane as a Sensing Method for Gaseous Hydrazine,” Daniel Schultz.

Mathematical Sciences: “Finite-Interval Overdamping: Phenomena, Analysis & Applications,” Daniel McCormick.

Physics: “Quality Control Testing of Large Area GEM Detectors for CMS Muon Endcap Upgrade,” Sarah Arends, Jerry Collins, Mehdi Rahmani and Stefano Colafranceschi.

Astronomy & Astrophysics: “3D Visualizations of Extragalactic HI Radio Sources on Kilo-Parsec Scales,” Alicia Harris.

Space Sciences: “Characterizing Exoplanets via Planet-Planet Interactions,” Mackenzie Kane.

Sustainability: “Solar Design Alternatives for a Proposed Academic Quad Rebuild,” Aasav Harania, Daniel Oliva and Michael Garofalo.

Overall, the showcase included projects and posters developed by hundreds of undergraduate students, working on their own or in teams, from academic departments throughout the College of Science and the College of Engineering.

Participating students, who must conceive, research and/or design and implement their projects, gain hands-on experience in applying science or engineering knowledge and the fundamental principles of their respective majors.

Jeff Reed, who led the entire team of Northrop Grumman judges at the event said, “What I’ve seen at this year’s showcase is nothing short of incredible.”

Article by Florida Tech Blog, Complete Article [ HERE ]

Michael Ennis is a manufacturing engineer at Harris Corp., and chairman of the Manufacturing Association of Florida’s Space Coast (MASC.) (Photo: Provided)

Michael Ennis is a manufacturing engineer at Harris Corp., and chairman of the Manufacturing Association of Florida’s Space Coast (MASC.) (Photo: Provided)

Manufacturing is a rewarding profession, offering fulfilling work with opportunities for career advancement in multiple sectors of the industry.

Manufacturing in America creates products that improve the lives of people all over the world. More importantly, manufacturing offers exciting jobs, with great pay and benefits for American families.

So why is manufacturing not the first choice for today’s workforce? Perhaps it is because we, as manufacturers, have not done our job to show you how technology has changed the industry. Or told you about the great environment, the high level of job satisfaction, or the many benefits we provide.

When you think of manufacturing, do you picture a modernized, sophisticated and automated work environment, with clean rooms and atmosphere controlled work areas? Do you picture workers programming machines or working in teams to produce a final product? If not, you should, because this is what today’s high-tech manufacturing looks like.

Another reason manufacturing should be your Plan A – the pay and benefits have also changed. According to the Department of Labor, the current average wage in the U.S. for a manufacturing position is $64,305. While this is not the starting salary, individuals can quickly advance within multiple career tracks through skills certifications, on-the-job training or a college degree. But that is not all, an study by the Kaiser Family Foundation shows 92 percent of manufacturing employees were eligible for health insurance benefits in 2015.

If the above has not convinced you to take a closer look at manufacturing as a career choice, consider the demand for skilled workers. The National Association of Manufacturers reports nearly 3.5 million manufacturing jobs will likely be needed over the next decade. Combine that with recent announcements by the Economic Development Commission of Florida’s Space Coast from manufacturing companies building new facilities in Brevard, and you have a framework for success.

If I have finally piqued your interest in a manufacturing career, I have done my job.

I am excited about manufacturing in America and the future of Brevard County as we continue to grow this high-tech industry.

You can learn more about this exciting industry at the Made In Brevard Expo from 2-6 p.m. May 17 at the Radisson Resort at the Port, Cape Canaveral. For additional information visit SpaceCoastEDC.org/Events.

Michael Ennis is a manufacturing engineer at Harris Corp., and chairman of the Manufacturing Association of Florida’s Space Coast (MASC.)

Article by Michael Ennis, Florida Today complete article [ HERE ]

 

COLORADO SPRINGS — The U.S. military is open to launching missions on used SpaceX rockets that could benefit national security by lowering launch costs and increasing flight opportunities from Cape Canaveral, the leader of Air Force Space Command said this week.

“I would be comfortable with flying with a reused booster,” Gen. John “Jay” Raymond told reporters at the 33rd Space Symposium in Colorado Springs. “They’ve proven they can do it. It’s going to get us to lower cost, it’s going to get us to being able to get satellites in orbit. That’s why they bring the boosters back. I think we’d be hard-pressed to say we’re not going to do it. We would embrace that.”

SpaceX on March 30 launched a commercial satellite to orbit from Kennedy Space Center with a Falcon 9 rocket whose first stage had launched a NASA mission a year earlier. It was the first time a large, liquid-fueled rocket boosted two different missions to orbit.

“SpaceX just launched the first certified, pre-owned, reusable launch vehicle,” Lt. Gen. David Buck, commander of the 14th Air Force and the Joint Functional Component Command for Space, said in the same news conference. “That’s pretty incredible. We have to embrace the technology.”

The Air Force has awarded SpaceX two contracts to launch Global Positioning System satellites on new Falcon 9 rockets, but has no immediate plans to fly on what SpaceX calls a “flight proven” rocket.

But Raymond expects that day to come.

“This is just the beginning,” he said. “I think the reduced cost of this is going to drive industry this way. I don’t think we can say we won’t follow suit. We’ll make sure we do it in smart way, and as this materializes, we’ll make sure that we have the processes in place to be able to do it safely and securely.”

Raymond also praised SpaceX and the 45th Space Wing for their recent implementation of automated systems onboard Falcon rockets that would command an off-course rocket to destroy itself.

SpaceX missions no longer need Air Force officers on the ground to send destruct commands, significantly reducing the infrastructure and personnel needed to track launches.

It’s an example, Raymond said, of the Air Force partnering with the commercial space industry to improve technology and efficiency.

“We have completely transformed how we do business at the Cape and at Vandenberg (Air Force Base in California),” he said. “We have really become much more responsive in how we do scheduling, how we do launch operations.”

 

The 45th Space Wing anticipates supporting nearly 50 launches a year within five years, as SpaceX flies more often, Blue Origin enters the scene and United Launch Alliance introduces a new rocket. Proposed small satellite launchers like Vector Space Systems could add more launches.

Raymond said the growing flight rate presents an opportunity, not an obstacle, for the Air Force.

“We will continue to focus on making sure that we have what we need in place to be able to support commercial industry,” he said. “That’s important for our national security. We’ll be fully supportive of commercial industry.”

Contact Dean at 321-242-3668 or jdean@floridatoday.com. Follow him on Twitter at @flatoday_jdean.

Article by James Dean, Florida Today, Complete Article [ HERE ]